CHF without Preserved Ejection Fraction

Introductory text goes here

What It Is
How It Happens
What To Do About It

(ejection fraction = EF)

When people have CHF, their hearts do a lousy job of beating and pumping blood around the body. With each beat, they simply don’t pump enough blood.

The average heartbeat pushes out a little more than a quarter of a cup (or, for you drinkers, about 1.5 shots) (or for you smart science types, about 70 ml).

Someone with congestive heart failure probably pumps out about 1/8 of a cup (or .75 shots) (or 35 ml).

Here’s the part that takes some thinking to understand. There are two kinds of heart failure:

  • Heart failure without preserved ejection fraction, and
  • Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

Here we’re going to discuss heart failure without preserved ejection fraction.

Let’s start by learning a little about ejection fraction.

Our blood basically travels around our bodies in a circle—They call it circulation, right? That means the heart pumps the blood out, the blood travels around the body, and then it comes back to the heart to be pumped again.

So, before each beat, the heart fills with blood….Now comes the catch— Even a healthy heart doesn’t pump all the blood in it out with each beat—it pumps out a little over half the blood in it out, or about 60%. (That means that, with each and every beat, about 60% of the blood is pumped out, and about 40% is left in.)

Heart Failure Without Preserved Ejection Fraction Hearts that have heart failure without preserved ejection fraction only pump out about 30% of the blood in them. They’re that weak and flabby. Some of those hearts were damaged by a heart attack. Others were damaged by the strain of pushing blood into blood vessels jammed up with high blood pressure for years and years. But, whatever caused it, these hearts are flabby and weak. Each beat pumps out only 1/3 of the blood in them.
Do something about your CHF without preserved EF Two kinds of medications help with CHF w/o preserved EF
  • ACE inhibitors (Lisinopril, Enalapril, Carvedilol, etc.) do two things:
    1. They open up those constricted, narrowed blood vessels. That makes it easier for the heart to pump blood into them.
    2. They’re kind of “mini-water pills.” They make you pee out some of the water that mixes with blood and jams up the blood vessels—making it hard for your heart to pump blood into them.
  • Beta blockers (Metoprolol, Carvedilol, etc.) do two things too:
    1. They open up those constricted, narrowed blood vessels. That makes it easier for the heart to pump blood into them.
    2. They slow down the heartbeat, giving the heart more time to fill up with blood, so it has more blood to pump out with each beat.

What It Is

(ejection fraction = EF)

When people have CHF, their hearts do a lousy job of beating and pumping blood around the body. With each beat, they simply don’t pump enough blood.

The average heartbeat pushes out a little more than a quarter of a cup (or, for you drinkers, about 1.5 shots) (or for you smart science types, about 70 ml).

Someone with congestive heart failure probably pumps out about 1/8 of a cup (or .75 shots) (or 35 ml).

Here’s the part that takes some thinking to understand. There are two kinds of heart failure:

  • Heart failure without preserved ejection fraction, and
  • Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

Here we’re going to discuss heart failure without preserved ejection fraction.

Let’s start by learning a little about ejection fraction.

Our blood basically travels around our bodies in a circle—They call it circulation, right? That means the heart pumps the blood out, the blood travels around the body, and then it comes back to the heart to be pumped again.

So, before each beat, the heart fills with blood….Now comes the catch— Even a healthy heart doesn’t pump all the blood in it out with each beat—it pumps out a little over half the blood in it out, or about 60%. (That means that, with each and every beat, about 60% of the blood is pumped out, and about 40% is left in.)

How It Happens

Heart Failure Without Preserved Ejection Fraction Hearts that have heart failure without preserved ejection fraction only pump out about 30% of the blood in them. They’re that weak and flabby. Some of those hearts were damaged by a heart attack. Others were damaged by the strain of pushing blood into blood vessels jammed up with high blood pressure for years and years. But, whatever caused it, these hearts are flabby and weak. Each beat pumps out only 1/3 of the blood in them.

What To Do About It

Do something about your CHF without preserved EF Two kinds of medications help with CHF w/o preserved EF
  • ACE inhibitors (Lisinopril, Enalapril, Carvedilol, etc.) do two things:
    1. They open up those constricted, narrowed blood vessels. That makes it easier for the heart to pump blood into them.
    2. They’re kind of “mini-water pills.” They make you pee out some of the water that mixes with blood and jams up the blood vessels—making it hard for your heart to pump blood into them.
  • Beta blockers (Metoprolol, Carvedilol, etc.) do two things too:
    1. They open up those constricted, narrowed blood vessels. That makes it easier for the heart to pump blood into them.
    2. They slow down the heartbeat, giving the heart more time to fill up with blood, so it has more blood to pump out with each beat.

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CHF with Preserved Ejection Fraction

(ejection fraction = EF)
When people have CHF, their hearts do a lousy job of beating and pumping blood around the body.

CHF without Preserved Ejection Fraction

(ejection fraction = EF)
When people have CHF, their hearts do a lousy job of beating and pumping blood around the body.

QUIZ-A-RAMA

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